The International Exhibition: Messrs. Harrison And Sons Power-Loom For Weaving Flax

The International Exhibition: Messrs. Harrison and Son's power-loom for weaving flax, 1862. 'This loom combines many important improvements. It is supplied with a self-acting positive letting-off motion, which delivers the warp as required by the taking-up motion for the cloth, which motion is also positive. These two motions work in concert, and with such precision that the warp is delivered from the yarnbeam with the same regularity when the beam is almost empty as when it is full. The taking- up roller of this loom is covered with a patented description of surfacing material instead of that in ordinary use, made of emery. It is also supplied with the weft-stopping motion and other important appliances...the cranks are made of one piece of iron, bent by a graduated pressure being applied to them, the fibre of which thus remains undisturbed, and renders the cranks much stronger than when welded;...the bend of the crank - generally its weakest part - by the adoption of this plan becomes equal in strength to any other. A loom of this description is capable of weaving upwards of 180 yards of linen per week. One man looks after two looms'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Creator: Unknown. (Photo by The Print Collector/Heritage Images via Getty Images)
The International Exhibition: Messrs. Harrison and Son's power-loom for weaving flax, 1862. 'This loom combines many important improvements. It is supplied with a self-acting positive letting-off motion, which delivers the warp as required by the taking-up motion for the cloth, which motion is also positive. These two motions work in concert, and with such precision that the warp is delivered from the yarnbeam with the same regularity when the beam is almost empty as when it is full. The taking- up roller of this loom is covered with a patented description of surfacing material instead of that in ordinary use, made of emery. It is also supplied with the weft-stopping motion and other important appliances...the cranks are made of one piece of iron, bent by a graduated pressure being applied to them, the fibre of which thus remains undisturbed, and renders the cranks much stronger than when welded;...the bend of the crank - generally its weakest part - by the adoption of this plan becomes equal in strength to any other. A loom of this description is capable of weaving upwards of 180 yards of linen per week. One man looks after two looms'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Creator: Unknown. (Photo by The Print Collector/Heritage Images via Getty Images)
The International Exhibition: Messrs. Harrison And Sons Power-Loom For Weaving Flax
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Credit:
Heritage Images / Contributor
Editorial #:
2063026124
Collection:
Hulton Archive
Date created:
01 January, 1900
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Source:
Hulton Archive
Object name:
3008881
Max file size:
1963 x 1520 px (16.62 x 12.87 cm) - 300 dpi - 2 MB