The International Exhibition: Clock

The International Exhibition: clock, candelabra, and portes bouquets, by M. Poilleux, of Paris, 1862. '...the French have long surpassed us in cheapness of production and in artistic taste, knowledge of drawing, and modelling displayed. [Engraving shows]...an ornamental figure clock and candelabra, and two portes bouquets, which are en suite and of oxydised silver-work relieved by gilding. The figure on the top of the clock is that of Penelope, who is represented as having fallen asleep in her weary task of unpicking the net which she had woven by day in the presence of her importunate and eager suitors. The grace of the figure, the classical contour of form, and the management of the drapery reflect very great credit on the artist, M. Julien Rameu, who is the son-in-law of M. Poilleux, and the artist-manager of the firm. The choice of the subject for a timepiece strikes us also as singularly appropriate: the distaff has fallen from the hands of the most faithful wife of antiquity, and in very weariness she seems to have fallen asleep...Let us hope that during her sleep the hours will fly swiftly to the tired watcher. The vases and candelabra are very light and pretty, and consist entirely of ornament very freely and gracefully disposed'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Creator: Unknown. (Photo by The Print Collector/Heritage Images via Getty Images)
The International Exhibition: clock, candelabra, and portes bouquets, by M. Poilleux, of Paris, 1862. '...the French have long surpassed us in cheapness of production and in artistic taste, knowledge of drawing, and modelling displayed. [Engraving shows]...an ornamental figure clock and candelabra, and two portes bouquets, which are en suite and of oxydised silver-work relieved by gilding. The figure on the top of the clock is that of Penelope, who is represented as having fallen asleep in her weary task of unpicking the net which she had woven by day in the presence of her importunate and eager suitors. The grace of the figure, the classical contour of form, and the management of the drapery reflect very great credit on the artist, M. Julien Rameu, who is the son-in-law of M. Poilleux, and the artist-manager of the firm. The choice of the subject for a timepiece strikes us also as singularly appropriate: the distaff has fallen from the hands of the most faithful wife of antiquity, and in very weariness she seems to have fallen asleep...Let us hope that during her sleep the hours will fly swiftly to the tired watcher. The vases and candelabra are very light and pretty, and consist entirely of ornament very freely and gracefully disposed'. From "Illustrated London News", 1862. Creator: Unknown. (Photo by The Print Collector/Heritage Images via Getty Images)
The International Exhibition: Clock
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Credit:
Heritage Images / Contributor
Editorial #:
2063012808
Collection:
Hulton Archive
Date created:
01 January, 1900
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Not released. More information
Source:
Hulton Archive
Object name:
3008907
Max file size:
3455 x 1694 px (29.25 x 14.34 cm) - 300 dpi - 3 MB