US-ALASKA-ENVIRONMENT-CLIMATE-EROSION

Aerial view of melting permafrost tundra and lakes near the Yupik Eskimo village of Quinhagak on the Yukon Delta in Alaska on April 12, 2019. - According to scientists, Alaska has been warming twice as fast as the global average, with temperatures in February and March shattering records. "From 1901 to 2016, average temperatures in the mainland United States increased by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (one degree Celsius), whereas in Alaska they increased by 4.7 degrees," said Rick Thoman, a climate expert at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo by MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images)
Aerial view of melting permafrost tundra and lakes near the Yupik Eskimo village of Quinhagak on the Yukon Delta in Alaska on April 12, 2019. - According to scientists, Alaska has been warming twice as fast as the global average, with temperatures in February and March shattering records. "From 1901 to 2016, average temperatures in the mainland United States increased by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (one degree Celsius), whereas in Alaska they increased by 4.7 degrees," said Rick Thoman, a climate expert at the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo by MARK RALSTON/AFP via Getty Images)
US-ALASKA-ENVIRONMENT-CLIMATE-EROSION
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Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses. Full editorial rights UK, US, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Canada (not Quebec). Restricted editorial rights elsewhere, please call local office."TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Jocelyne ZABLIT " Alaska's indigenous people feel the heat of climate change."
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MARK RALSTON / Contributor
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1140636136
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AFP
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12 April, 2019
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AFP
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