Mexican Way Stations Mark Trail of Illegal Immigraion to US : News Photo

Mexican Way Stations Mark Trail of Illegal Immigraion to US

Credit: David McNew / Staff
SASABE, MEXICO - JUNE 06: Illegal immigrants, having arrived from Altar, walk west toward a dangerous area where many robberies occur near the US-Mexico border on June 6, 2006 in the village of Sasabe, Mexico, 60 miles north of Altar. More illegal immigrants pass through Altar, where immigrant smuggling is the primary industry, than any other town. Available services include 'coyotes' or guides, transportation over 60 miles or more of dirt road in vans carrying as many as 25 people, about 150 'hospedajes' or guest houses, provisions, a free mobile clinic catering mostly to people who were hurt trying to cross the border, and groups who warn immigrants on the dangers of the trek and help those in need. From here, most immigrants are guided through Sasabe, where nightly robberies have become an industry and rape is common, then across the US-Mexico border to walk for about 45 miles through the desert before being picked up by smuggler vehicles. It is during the walk that most of the 473 deaths of 2005 occurred, mostly from exposure to extreme heat and fatigue. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Caption:
SASABE, MEXICO - JUNE 06: Illegal immigrants, having arrived from Altar, walk west toward a dangerous area where many robberies occur near the US-Mexico border on June 6, 2006 in the village of Sasabe, Mexico, 60 miles north of Altar. More illegal immigrants pass through Altar, where immigrant smuggling is the primary industry, than any other town. Available services include 'coyotes' or guides, transportation over 60 miles or more of dirt road in vans carrying as many as 25 people, about 150 'hospedajes' or guest houses, provisions, a free mobile clinic catering mostly to people who were hurt trying to cross the border, and groups who warn immigrants on the dangers of the trek and help those in need. From here, most immigrants are guided through Sasabe, where nightly robberies have become an industry and rape is common, then across the US-Mexico border to walk for about 45 miles through the desert before being picked up by smuggler vehicles. It is during the walk that most of the 473 deaths of 2005 occurred, mostly from exposure to extreme heat and fatigue. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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Date created:
June 06, 2006
Editorial #:
71167030
Release info:
Not released.More information
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Collection:
Getty Images News
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Getty Images
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Source:
Getty Images South America
Object name:
71111165DM020_Mexican_Way_S

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Illegal immigrants having arrived from Altar walk west toward a... News Photo 71167030Altar,Arrival,Crime,Danger,Emigration and Immigration,Human Interest,Immigrant,Latin America,Latin American and Hispanic,Mexico,Moving Activity,National Border,Politics,Residential District,Stealing,Village,WalkingPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 2006 Getty ImagesSASABE, MEXICO - JUNE 06: Illegal immigrants, having arrived from Altar, walk west toward a dangerous area where many robberies occur near the US-Mexico border on June 6, 2006 in the village of Sasabe, Mexico, 60 miles north of Altar. More illegal immigrants pass through Altar, where immigrant smuggling is the primary industry, than any other town. Available services include 'coyotes' or guides, transportation over 60 miles or more of dirt road in vans carrying as many as 25 people, about 150 'hospedajes' or guest houses, provisions, a free mobile clinic catering mostly to people who were hurt trying to cross the border, and groups who warn immigrants on the dangers of the trek and help those in need. From here, most immigrants are guided through Sasabe, where nightly robberies have become an industry and rape is common, then across the US-Mexico border to walk for about 45 miles through the desert before being picked up by smuggler vehicles. It is during the walk that most of the 473 deaths of 2005 occurred, mostly from exposure to extreme heat and fatigue. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)